A Brief Guide to Dining in Ethnic Restaurants


One of the nice things about living in America is the diversity of foods available on demand. America is very much a melting pot and as people immigrated to our shores, they brought their own food specialties along. When trying to maintain a healthy diet, what are the best foods to choose when eating at an ethnic restaurant? Here are some basic guidelines to help you make better choices when dining out.

French cooks tend to use a lot of heavy creams, sauces, and pastries in their dishes. It’s OK to enjoy those foods as long as you use moderation and don’t eat them every day. Balance out the heavier dishes with foods such as steamed or poached fish, lightly sautéed vegetables, and salads. French Onion Soup is a great broth, but skip the cheese or have it as a meal. Mostly stick to lighter foods, and watch the butter sauce—it can make a low calorie dish like escargot become a high calorie meal.

Greek food is generally healthy, as it includes grains, fruits, vegetables, and olive oil. Some good choices are dolmades (stuffed grape leaves), baba ghannoush (eggplant-based appetizer), Greek salads, souvlaki (meat and vegetables), and low fat Greek yogurt. Use portion size caution for foods that have pasta, cheese, or a dough base (falafel is fried; spanakopita and moussaka have pasta and/or cheese; baklava has pastry). Also, remember that feta cheese, while delicious, is not low fat. Use in moderation on your salad.

Italian foods are most familiar to Americans. When eating out, remember this key point: in Italy, pasta is considered the first course and consists of one-cup serving. In America, restaurant servings may contain up to five cups of pasta! Enjoy your spaghetti, but order it as a side dish to complement a meal of chicken, veal, or fish. Start with a nice minestrone soup, which is filling but not overly caloric. If you order pizza, go for the thin crust. Avoid fried foods, and if you want a heavy meal like ziti or ravioli, eat  just part of it and take the leftovers home. If you must have a dessert, amoretti cookies are your best choice.

Spanish cuisine has traveled far and wide, influencing the Mexican cuisine as well as the cuisine of many South-American countries. Mexican foods tend to be high in calories due to the cheese, sour cream, and tortilla chips. A wise choice would be to start with a light gazpacho soup and then order fajitas or rice with chicken breast or another grilled entree. Avoid or eat very small portions of the tortilla chips, refried beans, and other foods that have a lot of cheese or guacamole.

Peruvian foods (as well as foods from many other Latin-American countries) have a mixed influence; immigrants had to change the recipes due to the lack of traditional ingredients. Avoid foods that are breaded, fried, or laden with cheese. Chicken dishes, usually prepared with tomatoes and spices, are a good choice, as are fish dishes. “Tapas” are a good way to sample foods that are higher in calories. Sweet potatoes make a great side dish as they are full of nutrients—just be sure you don’t load them with butter. Plantains are another good choice as long as they are not fried.

Chinese food is familiar to Americans, and the menus offer a lot of dishes with vegetables, lean protein, and healthy fats. Look for foods listed as steamed, poached, or roasted. Start with a wonton, hot-and-sour, or egg-drop soup; then enjoy chicken, fish, or vegetables, preferably with brown rice; Moo Goo Gai Pan is a great choice. Items to avoid are fried foods, white rice, anything labeled “sweet and sour,” General Tsao chicken, and lo mein. If the restaurant offers brown rice, that’s a great alternative to white or fried rice.

Japanese foods tend to be healthy, as they contain lots of soy-based foods and vegetables. These foods are also prepared with a minimal amount of oil. Good choices are edamame (soybeans), hijiki (cooked seaweed), miso soup (soybean paste with tofu and scallions), yosenabe (seafood and vegetables in broth), steamed brown rice and vegetables, and fish and vegetable sushi (but not all sushi is the same; for example, spicy tuna rolls and dragon rolls have twice the calories and fat as California rolls and spicy shrimp rolls).

Indian dishes include lots of vegetables, beans, and lean protein. Tandoori (roasted meat with yogurt and spices) or saag (a spinach/green leaf dish) are the most nutritious and have the least fat. Instead of Naan (a leavened flatbread), order Roti, made with stoneground wheat. Be cautious of foods such as puri (fried bread) and kheer (rice pudding with coconut milk), as well any any dish that uses ghee (clarified butter), muglai (cream sauce), or khopre (coconut oil).

We hope these tips for eating at ethnic restaurants are helpful. Enjoy the experience, but if you do choose a higher calorie meal, enjoy it in moderation and/or watch the rest of your meals for the day.

Are there any other foods you are interested in? Let us know and we will do a special article about them!

Click here to comment.

For more help, see your doctor or therapist.  Check out our Resources Partners when you click this link or click here to contact us. You can also call our toll-free Trucker Prayer Line at 1-877-797-PRAY (7729). We’re here for you.

Want to help? You can help us get the word out about www.driverswellness.com by forwarding a link of this blog to your trucker friends and family.                                                                                              

Send an e-mail to DWBlog@driverswellness.com to subscribe to this blog for free. These messages are brought to you by Drivers Wellness, an initiative of Transport For Christ. If you would like to give a donation to help us reach drivers, click here.

Disclaimer:  The content provided in this blog is for informational purposes only and is not professional medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or care. Further, it is not intended to be a substitute for physician’s advice. Always see the advice of a licensed physician concerning any question you have regarding any content obtained from this blog and any medical condition you believe may be relevant to you or someone else. Always consult with your physician or other qualified health care provider before embarking on a new treatment, diet, or fitness program.



Tags: archive,blog,weight management,ethnic food,ethnic restaurants



Have You Had Your Fruit Today?


You know the common adage, “One apple a day keeps the doctor away,” right? But do you ever get tired of “an apple a day”? Well, there are ways of making this habit a bit more interesting.

 

Instead of reaching for the familiar Red Delicious or Granny Smith, try one of the other hundreds of apple varieties available in the market (Fuji, Gala, Pink Lady, just to name a few). You may be surprised at how much flavor a different variety of apple has compared to the mild-tasting red delicious. Read the labels at the store to see a description of the apples and their flavors.

 

But apples aren’t the only fruits that aid your health. Have you had your daily Avocado? This is an all-over good choice, as avocados are rich in protein and potassium, as well as vitamins C, B, and E, and can actually lower cholesterol. Their creamy, buttery consistency seems suitable for a dip, but don’t make guacamole out of them. Slice them onto a salad or as a sandwich topper—you’ll be surprised at how much they add to them!

 

Plantains are not funny looking bananas! You can’t eat them raw. Cut a plantain into short lengths and then slit the skin to remove it. Then, fry or roast the fruit. They are a good source of dietary fiber, minerals (particularly potassium), and vitamins A and C, as well as the B-complex vitamins, particularly vitamin B6.

 

Each day try to eat foods with Vitamin C (citrus); Vitamin B3 (peanuts); Vitamin E (avocados); and Vitamin A (sweet potatoes).

And don’t forget the pineapple and mangoes! These fruits actually help fight your sweet tooth. Did you know that excess sugar in candy can actually cause your skin to sag? So eating fresh fruits to satisfy your sweet tooth can also help your appearance!

Click here to comment.

For more help, see your doctor or therapist.  Check out our Resources Partners when you click this link or click here to contact us. You can also call our toll-free Trucker Prayer Line at 1-877-797-PRAY (7729). We’re here for you.

Want to help? You can help us get the word out about www.driverswellness.com by forwarding a link of this blog to your trucker friends and family.                                                                                                 

Send an e-mail to DWBlog@driverswellness.com to subscribe to this blog for free. These messages are brought to you by Drivers Wellness, an initiative of Transport For Christ. If you would like to give a donation to help us reach drivers, click here.

Disclaimer:  The content provided in this blog is for informational purposes only and is not professional medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or care. Further, it is not intended to be a substitute for physician’s advice. Always see the advice of a licensed physician concerning any question you have regarding any content obtained from this blog and any medical condition you believe may be relevant to you or someone else. Always consult with your physician or other qualified health care provider before embarking on a new treatment, diet, or fitness program.



Tags: health,weight management,diet,fruit,blog,archive



"Eye See Food Part 2"


As we noted in our companion piece, “Eye See Food,” vegetables and spices are an important part of maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Along with those items, you should also make sure you get an ample daily intake of protein. Protein helps your body keep a balanced composition between fat and muscle.
 
Additionally, adding Vitamin D to the diet goes a long way to help with weight loss. Did you know that many Americans, especially those who are overweight, have a Vitamin D deficiency? The best way to tell if you are deficient in this important vitamin is to have your doctor do a simple blood test as part of your annual physical. You can then add Vitamin D3 (the best kind) to your diet with supplements or through eating foods rich in protein and Vitamin D.
 
Here are a few foods that are not only tasty, but are packed with nutrients:
FISH (based on a 3-oz serving:
  • Clams have 22 grams of protein, AND a days’ worth of Vitamin B12 which is necessary for energy
  • Salmon has 18 grams of protein and is packed with Omega-3 oils
  • Halibut has 16 grams of protein, B12, B6, B3, as well as vital minerals
  • Tuna has 13 grams of protein and Vitamin D
MEAT (based on a 3-oz. serving):
  • Steak has 33 grams of protein plus Iron
  • Chicken has 28 grams of protein plus Vitamin B6
  • Bison has 22 grams of protein as well as minerals
  • Turkey has 19 grams as well as amino acids
OTHER ITEMS:
  • Quinoa (a grain) has 4 grams of protein per ½ cup, plus vitamins and minerals
  • Milk has 9 grams of protein per cup
  • Greek Yogurt has 18 grams protein per 6 oz. cup (avoid the flavors with fruit/added sugar)
  • Cottage Cheese has 14 grams protein per ½ cup
  • Lentils have 4 grams protein per ¼ cup plus folate
  • Split peas have 8 grams protein per ½ cup
This list has a variety of food options, all of which give you a healthy serving of protein plus other nutrients. Pair them with the vegetables mentioned in the companion piece and you have a complete diet.
 
But a word of caution: when you make a salad, use caution when applying salad dressing. A serving of salad dressing is 2 tablespoons. Let’s be realistic – most of us don’t measure dressings, and end up drenching our good vegetables. Some dressings have more fat than a double cheeseburger! And many of the low fat and fat free versions are high in sugar.
 
If you are buying for home use, read the labels and avoid those with high fat contents, or those that contain hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated oil, as well as soybean oil, or high fat ingredients such as buttermilk. Also, be aware of the sodium and sugar contents. A vinegar-and-oil combination is always a good choice, as olive oil is a good source of mono-saturated fats – the good kind. If you are eating out, ask for vinegar and oil. If you eat at a fast food place, watch the quantity of dressing you are using. Many places give you two packs of dressing – that doubles the calories, fat, etc. And, as noted above, if you use a creamy dressing, it can have as much fat as a double cheeseburger or a half-dozen slices of bacon. Use good sense, measure as best you can, and try to enjoy the vegetables rather than the dressing.
 
 
For more help, see your doctor or therapist. Check out our Resources Partners when you click this link or click here to contact us. You can also call our toll-free Trucker Prayer Line at 1-877-797-PRAY (7729). We’re here for you.
 
Want to help? You can help us get the word out about www.driverswellness.com by forwarding a link of this blog to your trucker friends and family.
                                                                                                 
Send an e-mail to DWBlog@driverswellness.com to subscribe to this blog for free. These messages are brought to you by Drivers Wellness, an initiative of Transport For Christ. If you would like to give a donation to help us reach drivers, click here.
 

Disclaimer

The content provided in this blog is for informational purposes only and is not professional medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or care. Further, it is not intended to be a substitute for physician’s advice. Always see the advice of a licensed physician concerning any question you have regarding any content obtained from this blog and any medical condition you believe may be relevant to you or someone else. Always consult with your physician or other qualified health care provider before embarking on a new treatment, diet, or fitness program.



Tags: health,weight management,diet,blog,archive



"Eye See Food Part 1"


These days, we go to the local doctor or pharmacy whenever we need treatment or medications. But did you know that many of the medicines we use today, including aspirin, digitalis, and quinine have a background based on herbal remedies? In biblical times, people would seek herbalists or wise men to help cure their ailments. It was believed that God, Who gave man dominion over plants and animals, provided visual cues to plants placed on earth for the good of mankind. The signature of a plant gave clues to the use of that plant. For instance, yellow and sweet plants are good for the spleen; red and bitter are good for the heart; green and sour are good for the liver; black and salty are good for the lungs. Early herbalists used liverwort for liver trouble, wormwood to expel intestinal parasites, and toothwort to relieve toothaches.
 
Many herbs and spices that we use today are also useful as medicinal compounds. Cinnamon, garlic, ginger, and rosemary are good for your blood pressure; so are oregano, parsley, sage, thyme, and basil. Turmeric is great for balancing your glycemic index and aiding in the treatment of diabetes. So how can those old-fashioned cures apply to our modern-day life? Let’s look at some examples:
·         What does a kidney bean remind you of? Obviously it is kidney-shaped. Modern science has determined that kidney beans are good for healing and maintaining kidney function!
·         And the walnut? It looks like a little brain, complete with left and right hemispheres, upper and lower cerebellums, and wrinkles just like the neo-cortex. Eat walnuts to help maintain healthy brain functions.
·         Slice a carrot and look at the cross section—doesn’t it look just like an eye? We all should know that carrots contain beta-carotene and are good for eye health.
·         Look at a sliced tomato—four chambers and red, just like your heart. Eat tomatoes for your heart and blood.
·         Did you know that celery is good for bone health? (A stalk looks like a bony foot!) Both bones and celery are 20% sodium! While too much sodium is bad, not eating enough sodium can pull it from your bones, weakening them. Eat celery, as well as bok choy and rhubarb, to maintain a good balance of sodium.
·         Mushrooms, when cut in half, resemble a human ear. They contain vitamin D, which is important for healthy bones, including the bones in the ear.
·         Our lungs are made up of branches of ever smaller airways and tiny bunches of tissue called alveoli—similar to bunches of grapes. This fruit is excellent for reducing the risk of lung cancer, emphysema, and asthma.
·         Did you ever hear that eating ginger calms the stomach? Take a look at a piece of ginger: it looks just like a stomach. The Chinese have used ginger for over 2000 years to calm the stomach and cure nausea.
·         A sweet potato, which looks like a pancreas, balances the glycemic index of diabetics. If you have a choice, choose a sweet potato over a white potato for good health.
·         Ever cry when chopping onions? Onions look like body cells and help clear waste materials from all the cells of your body. That includes washing the epithelial layers of the eyes. Garlic is also a good cleanser for the body.
 
Eating a variety of fresh fruits and vegetables and avoiding processed foods are easy ways to maintain your health and avoid too many trips to the doctor/pharmacy.
 
 
For more help, see your doctor or therapist. Check out our Resources Partners when you click this link or click here to contact us. You can also call our toll-free Trucker Prayer Line at 1-877-797-PRAY (7729). We’re here for you.
 
Want to help? You can help us get the word out about www.driverswellness.com by forwarding a link of this blog to your trucker friends and family.
                                                                                                 
Send an e-mail to DWBlog@driverswellness.com to subscribe to this blog for free. These messages are brought to you by Drivers Wellness, an initiative of Transport For Christ. If you would like to give a donation to help us reach drivers, click here.
 
Disclaimer

The content provided in this blog is for informational purposes only and is not professional medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or care. Further, it is not intended to be a substitute for physician’s advice. Always see the advice of a licensed physician concerning any question you have regarding any content obtained from this blog and any medical condition you believe may be relevant to you or someone else. Always consult with your physician or other qualified health care provider before embarking on a new treatment, diet, or fitness program.



Tags: health,weight management,diet,blog,archive



Team Up On the Road to Health


In January 2012, Drivers Wellness featured a special weight-loss section. Are you participating in any of the weight-loss methods? Are they working for you, or do you still find yourself struggling with “weighty” issues? If you find that you are unable to make a commitment to a program, or that you struggle with “yo-yo” dieting, take a step back and look at it this way.

Several wellness sites note that people who have a lifestyle coach or an accountability partner, or are in a program in which they have help making good food choices, lose more weight than those who try it alone. A recent study at Johns Hopkins Hospital confirms that fact. The study involved telephone and web-based coaching to help patients lose weight. Results indicated that 40% of the patients enrolled in the study lost at least 5% of their body weight and gained significant health benefits.

No matter what “diet” plan you follow, if any, remember to eat a wide variety of foods in moderate amounts. Also, enjoy your meal at a leisurely pace and in the company of others whenever possible. And finally, consider teaming up as you work towards better health. Your partner will help keep you 'drivin' straight' on the road to health.

Click here to comment.

For more help, see your doctor or therapist.  Check out our Resources Partners when you click this link or click here to contact us. You can also call our toll-free Trucker Prayer Line at 1-877-797-PRAY (7729). We’re here for you.

Want to help? You can help us get the word out about www.driverswellness.com by forwarding a link of this blog to your trucker friends and family.
 
Send an e-mail to DWBlog@driverswellness.com to subscribe to this blog for free. These messages are brought to you by Drivers Wellness, an initiative of Transport For Christ. If you would like to give a donation to help us reach drivers, click here.

Disclaimer
The content provided in this blog is for informational purposes only and is not professional medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or care. Further, it is not intended to be a substitute for physician’s advice. Always see the advice of a licensed physician concerning any question you have regarding any content obtained from this blog and any medical condition you believe may be relevant to you or someone else. Always consult with your physician or other qualified health care provider before embarking on a new treatment, diet, or fitness program.



Tags: accountability,health coach,health,weight management,diet,blog,archive



Where's the Trans Fat?


Did you ever play Where’s Waldo, the game where you try to find where Waldo is hiding in the picture? This month, let’s play Where’s the Trans Fat. It’s actually hiding in plain sight all over the place, even in foods labeled “0 Trans Fat.” Legally a label can say “0 Trans Fat” as long as the total amount of partially hydrogenated oils is less than 0.5 grams; that may not seem like a lot, but if you add up all the less than 0.5 grams in the food you consume, you will end up getting quite a bit of the “bad” fat that raises your bad cholesterol and lowers the good one. Most of us know that Trans Fat is found in fried foods, but did you know it is also in:

  • Non-dairy coffee creamers?
  • Microwave popcorn with butter or other pouredover flavors?
  • Margarine sticks? (Whipped spreads are usually OK.)
  • Many frozen or creamy beverages?
  • Meat sticks/jerky sticks?
  • Canned meats/chilies?
  • Shelf-stable packaged puddings?

Read the label before you eat. If the ingredients list includes hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated oils, consume with caution—or better yet, avoid them altogether!

Click here to comment.

For more help, see your doctor or therapist.  Check out our Resources Partners when you click this link or click here to contact us. You can also call our toll-free Trucker Prayer Line at 1-877-797-PRAY (7729). We’re here for you.

Want to help? You can help us get the word out about www.driverswellness.com by forwarding a link of this blog to your trucker friends and family.
 
Send an e-mail to DWBlog@driverswellness.com to subscribe to this blog for free. These messages are brought to you by Drivers Wellness, an initiative of Transport For Christ. If you would like to give a donation to help us reach drivers, click here.

Disclaimer
The content provided in this blog is for informational purposes only and is not professional medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or care. Further, it is not intended to be a substitute for physician’s advice. Always see the advice of a licensed physician concerning any question you have regarding any content obtained from this blog and any medical condition you believe may be relevant to you or someone else. Always consult with your physician or other qualified health care provider before embarking on a new treatment, diet, or fitness program.



Tags: health,weight management,diet,blog,archive



More Breakfast News


In our January Drivers Wellness feature, we made recommendations for starting the day right with a good breakfast. Here is some interesting information about breakfast cereals.

The Environmental Working Groups (ewg.org) analyzed 84 cereals and posted a list of the worst choices for a healthy breakfast. Did you know that some cereals (1 cup serving) can have 20 grams of sugar—more than a Hostess Twinkie?

The next time you are at a breakfast buffet with cereal choices or eating cereal at home, take a moment to read the nutritional information on the side of the box. And remember that a serving is ¾ cup (the size of a single serving box), not a bowlful.

Making wise cereal choices can help if you are following the Glycemic Index plan (green, yellow or red light foods), or just watching calories. So for all of us who love those delicious cereals (I’ll abstain from mentioning brands—you know which ones I am talking about!), we need to exercise caution in how often we eat them. And if you really want some, try them as a snack or dessert, rather than a breakfast meal choice. 

Click here to comment.

For more help, see your doctor or therapist.  Check out our Resources Partners when you click this link or click here to contact us. You can also call our toll-free Trucker Prayer Line at 1-877-797-PRAY (7729). We’re here for you.

Want to help? You can help us get the word out about www.driverswellness.com by forwarding a link of this blog to your trucker friends and family.
 
Send an e-mail to DWBlog@driverswellness.com to subscribe to this blog for free. These messages are brought to you by Drivers Wellness, an initiative of Transport For Christ. If you would like to give a donation to help us reach drivers, click here.

Disclaimer
The content provided in this blog is for informational purposes only and is not professional medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or care. Further, it is not intended to be a substitute for physician’s advice. Always see the advice of a licensed physician concerning any question you have regarding any content obtained from this blog and any medical condition you believe may be relevant to you or someone else. Always consult with your physician or other qualified health care provider before embarking on a new treatment, diet, or fitness program.



Tags: health,weight management,diet,blog,archive



And Another Word About Sodas


A recent report noted that the average American drinks 44.7 gallons of soda a year—enough to fill a small kiddie pool!

Previous articles in Drivers Wellness have noted the caloric content of sodas, but here is another point to consider: Citrus- flavored sodas contain a chemical called Brominated Vegetable Oil (BVO) which prevents the citrus flavors from separating from the drink. (Note: cola flavored drinks do not contain BVO.) If you hold up a citrus- flavored beverage to the light, you can see cloudiness, an indication that the product contains BVO. But did you know that BVO is also used as a flame retardant? There is concern among scientists and nutritionists that BVO is harmful to the human body. Some people who consume large amounts of this chemical have developed skin lesions, memory loss, and nerve disorders.

Regular sodas contain high fructose corn syrup (HFCS), a genetically modified food source. This product has only been on the market since the 1990s, and there is no long-term evidence against human consumption.

Generally, a soda or two won’t be harmful. However, remember that sodas are empty calories. Substituting an alternative such as low-fat, regular or chocolate milk can go a long way towards giving your body the nutrients it needs. 

Click here to comment. 

For more help, see your doctor or therapist.  Check out our Resources Partners when you click this link or click here to contact us. You can also call our toll-free Trucker Prayer Line at 1-877-797-PRAY (7729). We’re here for you.

Want to help? You can help us get the word out about www.driverswellness.com by forwarding a link of this blog to your trucker friends and family.
 
Send an e-mail to DWBlog@driverswellness.com to subscribe to this blog for free. These messages are brought to you by Drivers Wellness, an initiative of Transport For Christ. If you would like to give a donation to help us reach drivers, click here.

Disclaimer
The content provided in this blog is for informational purposes only and is not professional medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or care. Further, it is not intended to be a substitute for physician’s advice. Always see the advice of a licensed physician concerning any question you have regarding any content obtained from this blog and any medical condition you believe may be relevant to you or someone else. Always consult with your physician or other qualified health care provider before embarking on a new treatment, diet, or fitness program.


Tags: archive,health,weight management,diet,blog



Weight Management Checkup


In January, Highway News and Good News published a special segment on ways to lose and manage weight. How are you doing? Did you find the tips helpful?

Most of us know that obesity is caused by a sedentary lifestyle (whether it’s driving a truck or sitting at a desk) as well as food consumption. Our society tends to eat a lot of processed, pre-packaged foods, as well as dine out where meals are usually full of fat to enhance the flavors.

But those factors may not be the only root cause of obesity today. Drivers Wellness recently came across an article that postulated obesity actually began in the 1950s. Doctors at that time advised women to not gain more than a few pounds during pregnancy; additionally, breast feeding was replaced by bottle feeding. This advice resulted in lower weight babies who spent their lives eating to regain the nutrition that was missing from the in-utero phase.

Consequently, with the obesity problem now, overweight women are giving birth to bigger babies that have difficulty recognizing true hunger symptoms and whose bodies have difficulty managing blood glucose. Statistics show that in the 1960s, middle-aged men were on average 27 pounds lighter than middle-aged men in 2002. Women were more than 25 pounds lighter. The Institute of Medicine and U.S. Surgeon General are now making recommendations on pregnancy weight gain and breast feeding. However, it may take two or more generations to reverse the trend.

You can help balance your weight now by concentrating on nutrient-dense foods and avoiding empty calories. Most people snack because their meals don’t contain enough fuel and nutrients to maintain their body. If your body is getting the nutrition it needs, you won’t crave additional food. Eat a wide variety of foods in moderate amounts and your body will adjust its weight accordingly.

Click here to comment.

For more help, see your doctor or therapist.  Check out our Resources Partners when you click this link or click here to contact us. You can also call our toll-free Trucker Prayer Line at 1-877-797-PRAY (7729). We’re here for you.

Want to help? You can help us get the word out about www.driverswellness.com by forwarding a link of this blog to your trucker friends and family.
 
Send an e-mail to DWBlog@driverswellness.com to subscribe to this blog for free. These messages are brought to you by Drivers Wellness, an initiative of Transport For Christ. If you would like to give a donation to help us reach drivers, click here.

Disclaimer
The content provided in this blog is for informational purposes only and is not professional medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or care. Further, it is not intended to be a substitute for physician’s advice. Always see the advice of a licensed physician concerning any question you have regarding any content obtained from this blog and any medical condition you believe may be relevant to you or someone else. Always consult with your physician or other qualified health care provider before embarking on a new treatment, diet, or fitness program.



Tags: archive,blog,diet,weight management,health



How Much Salt Do We Really Need?


Sodium chloride (salt, common salt, table salt or halite): a necessary constituent of the body and therefore of the diet, involved in maintaining osmotic tension of blood and tissues; uses include replenishment of electrolytes in the body, irrigation of wounds and body cavities, inhaled mucolytic, topical osmotic ophthalmic agent, and preparation of pharmaceuticals.

Recently, I was a patient in a hospital that offered patients the option of ordering freshly prepared meals if they desired. Imagine my surprise when I read the nutritional ticket that came with my meal. Items that were freshly prepared and designated “heart-healthy” contained as much as 1500 mg sodium! That was for one meal. The daily total for three meals could average as much as 4500 mg of sodium!

Your body needs 500 mg of sodium a day to maintain normal support of bodily function such as electrolyte balance. The USRDA recommended daily amount is 1500 mg; however, most people consume approximately 3500 mg per day.

Most of us are aware that sodium can raise blood pressure, but did you also know that excessive sodium can lead to cancer, osteoporosis, diabetes, dementia, sleep apnea, and kidney disease? Too much or too little salt in the diet can lead to muscle cramps, dizziness, or electrolyte disturbance, which can cause neurological problems. Excessive sodium can also leech the moisture out of your skin, leaving it dry and dull.

While some folks enjoy shaking the salt over their foods, most of the sodium we consume comes from pre-packaged foods. Even foods we would consider non-salty, like peanut butter and bread, can double or even quadruple your daily sodium intake. Additionally, prepared foods don’t even use the iodized version of salt that your body needs to maintain thyroid function.

The best way to monitor your daily sodium intake is to read food labels and keep track of the sodium content (if eating out, many restaurants now provide nutrition information of their foods on their websites). Try to eat fresh foods as much as possible. For instance, fresh baked bread contains less sodium and preservatives than commercially-produced breads.

Here are some food groups with high sodium counts:

  • Any foods that are smoked or cured, including ham, bacon, hot dogs, luncheon meats and cheese
  • Canned vegetables, unless they’re marked “low sodium”; but you should still check the label. (Plain frozen vegetables have virtually zero sodium.)
  • Pickles and olives
  • Tartar sauce
  • Sauces, such as soy or tomato
  • Gravies
  • Soups, broths
  • Vegetable juices (unless marked “low sodium”; again, check the label)
  • Fried or seasoned rice

Limit your consumption of these foods. If you want to enjoy one of them, be sure to not have other foods that are high in sodium that day. The key is to enjoy yourself, but be aware of your total daily consumption of sodium.

Sea salt and kosher salt are becoming very popular; however, both contain the same amount of sodium as regular table salt. There may be some differences in flavor, but salt is salt, no matter where it was mined. Look for alternatives such as salt substitutes or other spices that can help flavor your meal.

Click here to comment.

For more help, see your doctor or therapist.  Check out our Resources Partners when you click this link or click here to contact us. You can also call our toll-free Trucker Prayer Line at 1-877-797-PRAY (7729). We’re here for you.

Want to help? You can help us get the word out about www.driverswellness.com by forwarding a link of this blog to your trucker friends and family.
 
Send an e-mail to DWBlog@driverswellness.com to subscribe to this blog for free. These messages are brought to you by Drivers Wellness, an initiative of Transport For Christ. If you would like to give a donation to help us reach drivers, click here.

Disclaimer
The content provided in this blog is for informational purposes only and is not professional medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or care. Further, it is not intended to be a substitute for physician’s advice. Always see the advice of a licensed physician concerning any question you have regarding any content obtained from this blog and any medical condition you believe may be relevant to you or someone else. Always consult with your physician or other qualified health care provider before embarking on a new treatment, diet, or fitness program.



Tags: blog,diet,weight management,health,archive



Be Gastronomically Adventurous!


Did you know that our ancient ancestors ate a better variety of foods than we do today? Those nomadic people ate more protein and five times as much vitamin C than the average person today.
 
We hear a lot of talk about modern-day diets (heavy on processed and fast foods) and what they have done to our general health. It’s no surprise that people who eat from the middle aisles of the average supermarket tend to eat more processed foods that cause weight gain. (We need to include a disclaimer here, as many stores are setting up healthy and/or organic foods in the center aisles. Good for them!)
 
The next time you go shopping, try to stick with foods in the perimeter of the store—fruits & vegetables,fresh meats, whole grains. And be adventurous—get something that you don’t normally buy. Many of the major supermarkets carry a variety of fruits and vegetables. For example, instead of a regular orange, try something unusual, like one of the options below:

Clementine (a type of seedless mandarin orange)
Kumquat (citrus fruit with an edible skin)
Minneola (a cross between a tangerine and a grapefruit)
Tangelo (an orange-red mandarin orange)
Ugli fruit (a specific type of tangelo, easier to peel; it’s a cross between a tangerine, a grapefruit and an orange)

 
For more help, see your doctor or therapist. Check out our Resources Partners when you click this link or click here to contact us. You can also call our toll-free Trucker Prayer Line at 1-877-797-PRAY (7729). We’re here for you.
 
Want to help? You can help us get the word out about www.driverswellness.com by forwarding a link of this blog to your trucker friends and family.
                                                                                                 
Send an e-mail to DWBlog@driverswellness.com to subscribe to this blog for free. These messages are brought to you by Drivers Wellness, an initiative of Transport For Christ. If you would like to give a donation to help us reach drivers, click here.
 
Disclaimer
The content provided in this blog is for informational purposes only and is not professional medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or care. Further, it is not intended to be a substitute for physician’s advice. Always see the advice of a licensed physician concerning any question you have regarding any content obtained from this blog and any medical condition you believe may be relevant to you or someone else. Always consult with your physician or other qualified health care provider before embarking on a new treatment, diet, or fitness program.


Tags: health,weight management,blog,archive



More Easy Tips for Losing Weight


Research is showing that people who take small steps to lose a few pounds at a time are more successful than people who make aggressive lifestyle changes, like going on an extreme diet (usually abandoning it a few weeks or months later). Here are a few more hints you can add to previous tips to help you lose weight:

• At the start of a meal, dip a piece of whole grain bread into some olive oil—whole grains help you feel fuller.
• Drink low-fat chocolate milk—it helps drinkers gain muscle and lose fat when consumed after exercise.
• Use apple butter instead of margarine or butter—it has only 20 calories and 0 grams of fat per serving. This is an easy, delicious way to cut calories!
• Use cinnamon as a sweetener—it adds flavor, helps metabolize sugar, and works well as a sugar substitute in coffee.
• Blot your pizza with a napkin; this can dab off 30 calories and 4.5 grams of fat per slice. Also, remember that veggie pizza has less calories and fat than styles that contain fatty meats.
• Substitute a buffalo steak for beef steak and save calories and fat! Buffalo is lower in fat than beef. A 3-oz buffalo steak has 148 calories, 4 grams of fat, and 26 grams of lean protein, which helps fill you up.

Find other easy-to-follow tips in The Small Change Diet by Keri Gans, spokesperson for the American DieteticAssociation. Making small, smart changes can reverse alifetime of poor eating habits. The book is available frommajor booksellers. 
 
For more help, see your doctor or therapist. Check out our Resources Partners when you click this link or click here to contact us. You can also call our toll-free Trucker Prayer Line at 1-877-797-PRAY (7729). We’re here for you.
 
Want to help? You can help us get the word out about www.driverswellness.com by forwarding a link of this blog to your trucker friends and family.
                                                                                                 
Send an e-mail to DWBlog@driverswellness.com to subscribe to this blog for free. These messages are brought to you by Drivers Wellness, an initiative of Transport For Christ. If you would like to give a donation to help us reach drivers, click here.
 
Disclaimer
The content provided in this blog is for informational purposes only and is not professional medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or care. Further, it is not intended to be a substitute for physician’s advice. Always see the advice of a licensed physician concerning any question you have regarding any content obtained from this blog and any medical condition you believe may be relevant to you or someone else. Always consult with your physician or other qualified health care provider before embarking on a new treatment, diet, or fitness program.



Tags: health,weight management,blog,archive



Looking for Meatless Protein Options?


A January Drivers Wellness article noted that one of the easy ways to lose a few pounds is to eliminate meat from your meal a couple of times a week. A driver had a good question about this suggestion: if we are supposed to eat protein because it is good for our bodies and it is filling, why should we eliminate meat, which is a good source of protein? The answer is that there are meatless proteins that you can either substitute for a meat or add to your daily intake to increase your consumption of good protein. Here are some meatless protein options:

  • Beans (black, kidney, lima, navy, etc.), as well as split peas, chickpeas, and hummus; one cup has thirteen grams of protein—as much as a 3 oz. steak. Eat split pea soup, add black beans to your taco, or spread hummus on a cracker for a snack—be creative
  • Eggs: One egg has six grams of protein (as well as essential amino acids). Have eggs for a meal, hardboiled for a snack, chopped up on a salad, or as an omelet (add cheese and beans to increase your protein).
  • Dairy (milk, cheese, yogurt): All milk (whole, skim, or low fat) has eight grams of protein per cup; cheese has approximately ten grams per slice (depending on type); yogurt has thirteen or more grams per cup, depending on the type (opt for Greek, which is the best).
  • Whole Grains: Whole grains (quinoa, amaranth, barley, buckwheat, corn, millet, oats, rice, rye, smelt, wheat, etc.) range from ten to sixteen grams of protein per cup. Have whole grain bread for a sandwich (egg salad or peanut butter, for extra protein), buckwheat pancakes (watch the syrup), or add brown rice as a side dish.
  • Seafood: Depending on the type, has from fifteen to twenty-seven grams of protein per oz. serving. Cold water fishes, such as halibut, pack extra benefits, like higher protein and Omega-fatty acids.
  • Soy: It can be consumed in many forms, from edamame (eleven grams of protein per half cup), to tofu, soy burger, and soy nut butter.
  • Snacks: Nuts (peanuts, cashews, almonds, and walnuts), seeds (sesame, sunflower), nut butters (and not just peanut butter; try almond and soy nut butter). Eat these sparingly, though, as they are high fat; however, they make an excellent protein snack. 

And, please let us know if you have any questions or need clarification on our wellness articles.

Click here to comment.

For more help, see your doctor or therapist.  Check out our Resources Partners when you click this link or click here to contact us. You can also call our toll-free Trucker Prayer Line at 1-877-797-PRAY (7729). We’re here for you.

Want to help? You can help us get the word out about www.driverswellness.com by forwarding a link of this blog to your trucker friends and family.                                                                                               

Send an e-mail to DWBlog@driverswellness.com to subscribe to this blog for free. These messages are brought to you by Drivers Wellness, an initiative of Transport For Christ. If you would like to give a donation to help us reach drivers, click here.

Disclaimer

The content provided in this blog is for informational purposes only and is not professional medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or care. Further, it is not intended to be a substitute for physician’s advice. Always see the advice of a licensed physician concerning any question you have regarding any content obtained from this blog and any medical condition you believe may be relevant to you or someone else. Always consult with your physician or other qualified health care provider before embarking on a new treatment, diet, or fitness program.



Tags: archive,blog,weight management,health



It's February...How's Your Diet?


One of the special wellness features in last month’s magazine offered ten easy ways to lose ten pounds (OK, ten “not-so-hard” ways to lose ten pounds). Although some people may need to go on a stricter weight loss program for health reasons, most people can be successful with a more moderate program.
Losing weight in small increments is an easier way to achieve a healthy weight. Keep in mind it won’t happen overnight, and you will need to retrain your eating habits. However, people find such a plan easier to stick with than methods that require major lifestyle changes. Simply eliminating 500 calories a day (equivalent to a movie theater-size large soda) will help you lose up to one pound a week. The more calories you eliminate, the more pounds lost. Add in a little light exercise and you are well on your way to a healthier lifestyle.
 
One easy way to save calories is by monitoring your food selections. What may seem like a healthy food choice may actually be full of calories, salt, and trans fats. For instance, spinach and artichokes are healthy foods. However, if you order the spinach/artichoke dip at a certain popular restaurant, you are actually eating 1610 calories—all due to the cream, cheese, and butter used in dip. And that’s just the appetizer! In general, use caution when ordering appetizers, as most are full of fats, salt, and other items that, while making them appetizing, also make them very fattening. Better choices are shrimp cocktails or raw vegetable platters with a low-fat dip. These foods stimulate your appetite without dramatically increasing your calories count. Or, if you really want one of the more fattening appetizers, make it your main course and add a salad to complete the meal.
 
Nutritionists recommend grilled chicken salad as a healthy meal choice, as it combines lean protein and vegetables. However, stay away from “bready” additions like Chinese noodles or croutons. Try using olive oil and vinegar as a dressing, and add an ounce of nuts (about 13) to satisfy your need for crunchy foods. Almonds are perfect—full of the good kind of fat and the lowest in calories among nuts.
 
Be careful when ordering hamburgers or cheeseburgers at popular fast-food restaurants, as the calorie and fat count can vary drastically from restaurant to restaurant. That doesn’t mean you can’t have a good, juicy hamburger from time to time; just eliminate some of the condiments (especially mayonnaise) to reduce the calorie count. And remember that a regular-size burger often has less fat and calories than that extra crispy chicken sandwich (“crispy” usually meaning breaded and deep-fried). And how about pizza? Enjoy it now and then, but try to stick with a personal pan pizza. And avoid the deep dish type that can add close to 1,000 calories.
 
Now about drinks—research is showing that artificial sweeteners can actually cause weight gain. The reason is that artificial sweeteners are usually from 200 to 600 times sweeter than sugar and can cause cravings for additional sweets. An alternative is to order an unsweetened iced tea and use just a packet or two of real sugar if you desire sweetness. That equates to 32 calories, which can add up if you do it several times a day, but is considerably lower in calories than a regular drink that contains high fructose corn syrup.
 
The major key to healthy eating is to avoid fats, salt, and simple carbs. If you are eating out, ask if the restaurant has a nutritional guide, or check their website, as most now have a complete nutritional guide posted on their site. Bottom line, pick and choose wisely to enjoy life and lose weight!
 
 
For more help, see your doctor or therapist. Check out our Resources Partners when you click this link or click here to contact us. You can also call our toll-free Trucker Prayer Line at 1-877-797-PRAY (7729). We’re here for you.
 
Want to help? You can help us get the word out about www.driverswellness.com by forwarding a link of this blog to your trucker friends and family.
                                                                                                 
Send an e-mail to DWBlog@driverswellness.com to subscribe to this blog for free. These messages are brought to you by Drivers Wellness, an initiative of Transport For Christ. If you would like to give a donation to help us reach drivers, click here.
 
Disclaimer
The content provided in this blog is for informational purposes only and is not professional medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or care. Further, it is not intended to be a substitute for physician’s advice. Always see the advice of a licensed physician concerning any question you have regarding any content obtained from this blog and any medical condition you believe may be relevant to you or someone else. Always consult with your physician or other qualified health care provider before embarking on a new treatment, diet, or fitness program.


Tags: health,weight management,blog,archive



The Benefits of Omega-3


Studies have shown that Omega-3 fatty acids are effective in preventing heart disease. Your body does not make these acids and modern day diets of pre-packaged and fast foods don’t include enough fish and plant foods that contain Omega-3 fatty acids. Help yourself and your heart by adding salmon, sardines, walnuts, eggs, and flaxseed to your diet. Fish oil capsules are also a good option. And Omega-3 fatty acids also improve your mood!

Click here to comment.

For more help, see your doctor or therapist.  Check out our Resources Partners when you click this link or click here to contact us. You can also call our toll-free Trucker Prayer Line at 1-877-797-PRAY (7729). We’re here for you.

Want to help? You can help us get the word out about www.driverswellness.com by forwarding a link of this blog to your trucker friends and family.                                                                                                

Send an e-mail to DWBlog@driverswellness.com to subscribe to this blog for free. These messages are brought to you by Drivers Wellness, an initiative of Transport For Christ. If you would like to give a donation to help us reach drivers, click here.

Disclaimer
The content provided in this blog is for informational purposes only and is not professional medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or care. Further, it is not intended to be a substitute for physician’s advice. Always see the advice of a licensed physician concerning any question you have regarding any content obtained from this blog and any medical condition you believe may be relevant to you or someone else. Always consult with your physician or other qualified health care provider before embarking on a new treatment, diet, or fitness program.



Tags: heart disease,health,weight management,blog,archive



What is the glycemic index (GI) and why is it important?


Have you ever found yourself feeling hungry or ill shortly after eating a meal or snack? It may be due to the glycemic index of the food(s) you just consumed. Simple carbohydrates can cause the body to experience an initial feeling of well-being, followed by a “crash” when glucose levels drop. Complex carbohydrates provide a more even balance of glucose that helps avoid the “crash and burn” syndrome. This is how this works: Each food has a specific glycemic index (GI). This index tells how the food will affect your body’s blood glucose. Simple carbohydrates such as sugary items, refined grains, and starchy vegetables are high GI foods.

These foods cause the body to experience a steep, rapid increase in blood glucose, followed by a steep drop (the crash and burn effect). Lower GI foods such as whole grains and non-starchy vegetables keep blood glucose level, helping you stay full longer and avoiding the effects of a rapidly dropping blood glucose level. While watching the GI index of foods is extremely important for people who suffer from diabetes, every person will benefit from maintaining a healthy blood glucose level. Some studies have even noted a greater loss of fat mass when a person follows a low GI food diet.

One method to assess the GI of foods is the “Traffic Light System” in which low GI foods have a green light, medium GI foods have a yellow caution light,  and high GI foods have a red stop light.

“Green Light” low GI foods (value below 55) should be eaten frequently and in larger quantities. They include: all bran or whole grain cereals; whole wheat  or whole grain pastas and breads; dairy products; non-starchy vegetables such as carrots, broccoli, cauliflower, tomatoes, lettuce, green beans; legumes such as beans and lentils; fruits such as cherries, plums, grapefruit, peaches, apples, pears, oranges, strawberries.

“Yellow Light” medium GI foods (value between 56 and 69) should be eaten in moderation. They include: cereals that contain whole wheat; cornmeal, couscous, vermicelli; croissants, rye breads, buns; vegetables such as beetroots; fruits such as mangos, bananas, figs, pineapple.

“Red Light” high GI foods (value greater than 70) should be eaten infrequently (if at all) and include: sugary cereals; white breads; vegetables such as pumpkins, parsnips; starches such as rice, tapioca, potatoes; snacks such as pretzels, ricecakes, donuts, scones; fruits such as watermelon or dates.

For more information, Google “glycemic index” in your browser for a list of sites that include detailed lists of the GI value of popular foods.

Click here to comment.

For more help, see your doctor or therapist.  Check out our Resources Partners when you click this link or click here to contact us. You can also call our toll-free Trucker Prayer Line at 1-877-797-PRAY (7729). We’re here for you.

Want to help? You can help us get the word out about www.driverswellness.com by forwarding a link of this blog to your trucker friends and family.                                                                                               

Send an e-mail to DWBlog@driverswellness.com to subscribe to this blog for free. These messages are brought to you by Drivers Wellness, an initiative of Transport For Christ. If you would like to give a donation to help us reach drivers, click here.

Disclaimer
The content provided in this blog is for informational purposes only and is not professional medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or care. Further, it is not intended to be a substitute for physician’s advice. Always see the advice of a licensed physician concerning any question you have regarding any content obtained from this blog and any medical condition you believe may be relevant to you or someone else. Always consult with your physician or other qualified health care provider before embarking on a new treatment, diet, or fitness program.



Tags: archive,blog,health,weight management,blog,archive



Portion Size: A Guide


Did you ever wonder why you are not losing weight when you are following what appears to be a healthy diet of vegetables, protein, fruits and carbs? The problem may be your perception of portion size. This is one of the hidden ways in which we gain weight; and adjusting your portions is one of the simplest method to lose weight.

Do you sit down for breakfast with a bowl of healthy, high-fiber cereal? Check the portion size on the cereal box and compare it with what’s in your bowl. A serving size is usually 2/3 or 3/4 of a cup. If you measured what was in your bowl, you may find that you are actually eating three servings! A serving of bread is not two slices for your sandwich—it is one slice. A medium potato is the size of a computer mouse. A serving of meat is 3 oz. (about the size of a deck of cards). If you snack on nuts, check the bag or can for the portion size.

Check the list below for an idea of the average calorie count of some popular foods and drinks:

2 slices of pizza - 800 calories
Bagel - 350 calories
Cheeseburgers - 590 calories
Blueberry Muffin - 500 calories
Spaghetti with sauce and meatballs, 1 cup - 500 calories 

Going to the movies? Keep in mind that an average-size tub of popcorn packs a hefty total of 630 calories! And then there are the drinks: a 20-oz regular soda has about 250 calories. And watch those coffee drinks! While a cup of coffee with milk and sugar totals about 45 calories, a grand café mocha can have up to 330 calories!

It’s hard to count calories when you don’t measure your portions. An interactive menu planner, available at http://hp2010.nhlbihin.net/menuplanner/menu.cgi, can help keep track of what you are eating.

Watch your portion size and you may find yourself losing weight without even trying! 

Click here to comment.

For more help, see your doctor or therapist.  Check out our Resources Partners when you click this link or click here to contact us. You can also call our toll-free Trucker Prayer Line at 1-877-797-PRAY (7729). We’re here for you.

Want to help? You can help us get the word out about www.driverswellness.com by forwarding a link of this blog to your trucker friends and family.                                                                                                 

Send an e-mail to DWBlog@driverswellness.com to subscribe to this blog for free. These messages are brought to you by Drivers Wellness, an initiative of Transport For Christ. If you would like to give a donation to help us reach drivers, click here.

Disclaimer
The content provided in this blog is for informational purposes only and is not professional medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or care. Further, it is not intended to be a substitute for physician’s advice. Always see the advice of a licensed physician concerning any question you have regarding any content obtained from this blog and any medical condition you believe may be relevant to you or someone else. Always consult with your physician or other qualified health care provider before embarking on a new treatment, diet, or fitness program.



Tags: archive,blog,health,weight management



Start Slowly


Not feeling up to a full-fledged weight loss plan?  Start with small goals of ten-pound increments. An initial goal of reducing your baseline weight by 10% is a start, and will have an effect on many health risks. Here are a few tips to lose ten pounds the easy way (OK, the not-too-hard way):

• Drink plenty of water.
• Divide your normal portion in half; save the rest for later.
• Skip the meat; even a couple of meatless meals help with weight reduction.
• Eat fresh foods and reduce your consumption of canned and pre-packaged foods.
• Cut sugar and (white) flour from your diet; these white ingredients cause weight gain and bloating.
• Take short walking breaks whenever possible; every little bit adds up.
• Fill two-thirds of your plate with vegetables for fewer calories and more nutrition.
• Skip sugary drinks; a supersized soda can have over 500 calories!
• Green tea is an excellent antioxidant and aids in weight loss (but skip the milk and sugar).
• Non-creamy soups are good fillers; add a cup to your meal.
• Yogurt is a great way to get nutrition and keep a healthy weight.
• Diet two days a week and eat healthy the other five.
• Increase your fiber intake—eat more beans, lentils, and unprocessed fruit; add garbanzo beans to your salad. 

Don’t be overwhelmed by the amount of weight you need to lose. An initial goal of reducing your baseline weight by 10% is a start. You will soon notice improvement in many aspects of your health. Then, use a combination of reduced calories and increased activity to continue weight loss and then maintain a healthy weight.

Click here to comment.

For more help, see your doctor or therapist.  Check out our Resources Partners when you click this link or click here to contact us. You can also call our toll-free Trucker Prayer Line at 1-877-797-PRAY (7729). We’re here for you.

Want to help? You can help us get the word out about www.driverswellness.com by forwarding a link of this blog to your trucker friends and family.                                                                                                

Send an e-mail to DWBlog@driverswellness.com to subscribe to this blog for free. These messages are brought to you by Drivers Wellness, an initiative of Transport For Christ. If you would like to give a donation to help us reach drivers, click here.

Disclaimer
The content provided in this blog is for informational purposes only and is not professional medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or care. Further, it is not intended to be a substitute for physician’s advice. Always see the advice of a licensed physician concerning any question you have regarding any content obtained from this blog and any medical condition you believe may be relevant to you or someone else. Always consult with your physician or other qualified health care provider before embarking on a new treatment, diet, or fitness program.



Tags: weight management,health,blog,archive



Start Your Day Right


Have you ever heard the statement that weight loss comes from starting the day right with a good breakfast? Well, that is true—unless you grab a quick breakfast from a fast food restaurant. A breakfast sandwich that appears to be healthy with protein of breakfast meat, egg, and cheese actually contains between 600-800 calories and 1400 mg of sodium; a delicious cinnamon bun can have 1100 calories and more fat than nine chocolate chip cookies; and a seemingly healthy zucchini-walnut muffin contains 500 calories and 28 grams of fat!

For fewer calories and more satisfaction, you could eat an egg sandwich with avocado and tomato slices and even a slice of cheese; or try French toast topped with strawberry and banana; or consider an open-faced broiled egg. Of course, a healthy cereal and fresh fruit are always good choices.

Click here to comment.

For more help, see your doctor or therapist.  Check out our Resources Partners when you click this link or click here to contact us. You can also call our toll-free Trucker Prayer Line at 1-877-797-PRAY (7729). We’re here for you.

Want to help? You can help us get the word out about www.driverswellness.com by forwarding a link of this blog to your trucker friends and family.                                                                                                

Send an e-mail to DWBlog@driverswellness.com to subscribe to this blog for free. These messages are brought to you by Drivers Wellness, an initiative of Transport For Christ. If you would like to give a donation to help us reach drivers, click here.

Disclaimer
The content provided in this blog is for informational purposes only and is not professional medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or care. Further, it is not intended to be a substitute for physician’s advice. Always see the advice of a licensed physician concerning any question you have regarding any content obtained from this blog and any medical condition you believe may be relevant to you or someone else. Always consult with your physician or other qualified health care provider before embarking on a new treatment, diet, or fitness program.



Tags: weight management,health,blog,archive



New Year's Resolution: Let's Get Healthy!


OK, let’s face the facts—diet is a four-letter word that begins with DIE. However, with the physical requirements imposed by the DOT, drivers are facing the need to lose weight and get healthier if they want to keep their jobs. According to DOT requirements, medical fitness is required for duty—this includes weight management as well as management of associated problems such as high blood pressure and cholesterol, sleep apnea, and a host of other weight-related medical conditions. Losing weight for work-related reasons is important, but it is also important for improving your overall lifestyle. And it helps if you focus on “health” rather than “diet.”

This month, Drivers Wellness features an array of short articles that can help you regain your figure, your heart health and your relationship health too. We hope these special features will give you some tips that make the journey less painful. And, since January is the time of year when people want to start a new, healthier lifestyle, let’s get started together. (Please remember to consult with your health care professional before beginning a weight loss or exercise plan.)

Click on the individual titles below to read each article:

Start Your Day Right
Start Slowly
Portion Size: A Guide
What is the glycemic index (GI) and why is it important?
Watch for Your Risk Factors for Heart Disease
The Benefits of Omega-3
Be Nice

Click here to comment.

For more help, see your doctor or therapist.  Check out our Resources Partners when you click this link or click here to contact us. You can also call our toll-free Trucker Prayer Line at 1-877-797-PRAY (7729). We’re here for you.

Want to help? You can help us get the word out about www.driverswellness.com by forwarding a link of this blog to your trucker friends and family.        

Send an e-mail to DWBlog@driverswellness.com to subscribe to this blog for free. These messages are brought to you by Drivers Wellness, an initiative of Transport For Christ. If you would like to give a donation to help us reach drivers, click here.

Disclaimer
The content provided in this blog is for informational purposes only and is not professional medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or care. Further, it is not intended to be a substitute for physician’s advice. Always see the advice of a licensed physician concerning any question you have regarding any content obtained from this blog and any medical condition you believe may be relevant to you or someone else. Always consult with your physician or other qualified health care provider before embarking on a new treatment, diet, or fitness program.



Tags: relationships,weight management,heart disease,health,blog,archive